Blog - 14 Sep 2022

Each week David volunteers at the Wodonga Dog Rescue.  He is very keen on interacting with all the animals at the shelter, and every cat or dog that comes in has a sad story to tell. Being abandoned or surrendered means a stay in unfamiliar surroundings leading to stress and anxiety for the animals involved. This is the point where David...

Events - 5 Sep 2022, 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Aspire is pleased to facilitate two workshops with Dr Richard Eisenmajer, "Talking Autism Spectrum Disorders"  Richard is a Clinical Psychologist and founder and Director of The ASD Clinic. He has worked in a variety of positions, both within government and hospital settings, and for more than 20 years in private practice...

Events - 6 Sep 2022, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Aspire is pleased to facilitate two workshops with Dr Richard Eisenmajer, "Talking Autism Spectrum Disorders"  Richard is a Clinical Psychologist and founder and Director of The ASD Clinic. He has worked in a variety of positions, both within government and hospital settings, and for more than 20 years in private practice...

Events - 8 Feb 2022, 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Commencing Week 2 of Term 1 (08/02/2022)

Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays available
9:30am – 11:00am
Ages 0 – 6 years

Notice of Move from Borella Road Office

Please be advised that we have moved from our Borella Road office. Our Customer Service Centre is now based at our Dean Street office.

Address: Suite 2/647-653 Dean Street, Albury

Tim's Story

Tim Thompson is a musician, singer and comedian who happens to be on the autism spectrum. He thinks of his autism as a superpower and enjoys the fact that he isn’t like everyone else. When we sat down and chatted with Tim, he explained that not many people know or understand autism. He believes people adopt a one-size-fits all approach, but everyone is different – it’s called a spectrum for a reason.

When talking about how support services like Aspire can work with autistic people, Tim provided a few tips. For starters, when people work with autistic people they shouldn’t consider themselves an authority figure. They should work with the autistic person, rather than telling them what to do. Similarly, if a support worker sits on the couch all day and watches an autistic person go about their day, it’s not helpful for anyone – the autistic person isn’t getting the support they need to live their life, and the support worker isn’t doing their job. Tim expressed his frustration with how some people talk to him in a patronising way and ‘baby’ him. He just wants to sit down with someone and feel like he’s hanging out with a mate.

Welcome to Aspire Support Services

Aspire works alongside people with disabilities and their families to achieve their goals and aspirations. We believe that everyone should be able to achieve their goals and live the life they choose. Our focus is to work together with all to build a community where all people are empowered and supported.

Aspire's Statement of commitment to child safety

  • Aspire is deeply committed to creating and maintaining an environment that promotes the safety of all children.
  • Aspire will build a workplace culture where the prevention and reporting of abuse is supported and encouraged. 
  • All Aspire staff and volunteers are responsible for promoting the safety, wellbeing and empowerment of children. 

Leave your feedback

We welcome any feedback you have about your experience with Aspire Support Services.